mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.
mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.

mashallahblog:

The Djerbahood project gathers 100 artists from 30 countries to paint the streets and walls of Erriadh, a village in Djerba, Tunisia. The aim of this project is to transform the village into an open-air gallery of art, during July and August. Here are some of our favorite graffitis.

(via iamthecrime)

hragv:

Lessons in obsolescence. The smartphone in this 2013 drawing by Chelsea Yonkman is going to date quickly. (at Grand Rapids Public Museum)


Carine Brancowitz

Carine Brancowitz

Carine Brancowitz

Carine Brancowitz

Carine Brancowitz
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work? My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.
Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel

saatchiart:

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel

hifructosemag:

Australian artist David “Meggs” Hooke, opened his solo exhibition “Spoiled Rotten” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit on September 19. Using explosive bursts of colors and raw layers of texture, “Spoiled Rotten” explores themes of consumerism and over-obsession with pop culture as Hooke takes iconic images such as Mickey Mouse and yellow smiley faces and exposes their disposability. Read more on Hi-Fructose.
hifructosemag:

Australian artist David “Meggs” Hooke, opened his solo exhibition “Spoiled Rotten” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit on September 19. Using explosive bursts of colors and raw layers of texture, “Spoiled Rotten” explores themes of consumerism and over-obsession with pop culture as Hooke takes iconic images such as Mickey Mouse and yellow smiley faces and exposes their disposability. Read more on Hi-Fructose.
hifructosemag:

Australian artist David “Meggs” Hooke, opened his solo exhibition “Spoiled Rotten” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit on September 19. Using explosive bursts of colors and raw layers of texture, “Spoiled Rotten” explores themes of consumerism and over-obsession with pop culture as Hooke takes iconic images such as Mickey Mouse and yellow smiley faces and exposes their disposability. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

hifructosemag:

Australian artist David “Meggs” Hooke, opened his solo exhibition “Spoiled Rotten” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit on September 19. Using explosive bursts of colors and raw layers of texture, “Spoiled Rotten” explores themes of consumerism and over-obsession with pop culture as Hooke takes iconic images such as Mickey Mouse and yellow smiley faces and exposes their disposability. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art saatchiart:

thomassaliot:

Close Up faces by Thomas Saliot
oil on canvas

See Thomas Saliot’s work on Saatchi Art
lacarpa:

Sail Useless 
lacarpa:

Sail Useless 
lacarpa:

Sail Useless 
lacarpa:

Sail Useless 
lacarpa:

Sail Useless
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
lacarpa:

Leslie Ditto
ineedaguide:

illustrations by brittany schall
ineedaguide:

illustrations by brittany schall
ineedaguide:

illustrations by brittany schall
ineedaguide:

illustrations by brittany schall
lacarpa:

Michael Carson
lacarpa:

Michael Carson
lacarpa:

Michael Carson
lacarpa:

Michael Carson
lacarpa:

Michael Carson
lohrien:

Paintings by Danny O’Connor
lohrien:

Paintings by Danny O’Connor
lohrien:

Paintings by Danny O’Connor
lohrien:

Paintings by Danny O’Connor
hifructosemag:

Based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Anouk Griffioen creates haunting, mural-scale charcoal drawings that offer glimpses into lush, overgrown places where humanity and nature seamlessly connect. The human subjects of her work are merely guides for viewers to immerse themselves in the sublime landscapes. It’s as if Griffioen is inviting her viewers to imagine themselves as her often faceless characters. There is a fashion-conscious aspect to her work as well: the svelte, model-like bodies strike casual yet glamorous poses, wearing smartly tailored outfits that camouflage with their surroundings. Read more in Hi-Fructose. 
hifructosemag:

Based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Anouk Griffioen creates haunting, mural-scale charcoal drawings that offer glimpses into lush, overgrown places where humanity and nature seamlessly connect. The human subjects of her work are merely guides for viewers to immerse themselves in the sublime landscapes. It’s as if Griffioen is inviting her viewers to imagine themselves as her often faceless characters. There is a fashion-conscious aspect to her work as well: the svelte, model-like bodies strike casual yet glamorous poses, wearing smartly tailored outfits that camouflage with their surroundings. Read more in Hi-Fructose. 

hifructosemag:

Based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Anouk Griffioen creates haunting, mural-scale charcoal drawings that offer glimpses into lush, overgrown places where humanity and nature seamlessly connect. The human subjects of her work are merely guides for viewers to immerse themselves in the sublime landscapes. It’s as if Griffioen is inviting her viewers to imagine themselves as her often faceless characters. There is a fashion-conscious aspect to her work as well: the svelte, model-like bodies strike casual yet glamorous poses, wearing smartly tailored outfits that camouflage with their surroundings. Read more in Hi-Fructose

saatchiart:

Hyper real painting by Philippe Vignal France
saatchiart:

Hyper real painting by Philippe Vignal France
saatchiart:

Hyper real painting by Philippe Vignal France
saatchiart:

Hyper real painting by Philippe Vignal France